2011 Axial Seamount Volcano Audio and Video Clips


Audio
Credit: Bob Dziak, Oregon State University/NOAA
An underwater microphone (called a hydrophone) recorded sounds from earthquakes and
magma movement at the summit of Axial Seamount before and during its 2011 eruption.
The three audio clips provided are played back at three times normal speed so the low-frequency
sounds can be more easily heard.

WAV audio files
 
File Name
   
File size
 

Axial_Earthquake_SeafloorSurfaceReflection_x3.wav

593.2KB
    This recording is of the sounds made by a small earthquake (magnitude 1 to 3) that occurred beneath the summit of Axial Seamount. The first thump sound is the earthquake, which is followed by successive echos of the earthquake as the sound waves reflect back and forth between the top of the seamount and the ocean surface.  
 
     
 

AxialEruption_MagmaFlowing_x3.wav

1022KB
    This recording is the sound made by magma as it flows within the source reservoir deep within the seamount. The flowing magma makes a repetitive, bubbling sound.  
 
     
 

AxialEruption_SeismicSwarmPeak_x3.wav

194KB
    This recording was made during the peak of the earthquake swarm, when the largest number of earthquakes was occurring. The earthquakes are being made by magma that is breaking through rock, rising to erupt at the summit of the volcano.  
 
     
 

 

  To download file, Right-Click with your mouse on the file name or icon (Control-Click on a Mac) and download to your hard drive.  

Video
The six video clips are 25 to 60 seconds in duration. Each clip is provided in two formats,
an HD and a smaller compressed "low-res" format. The HD video clips are in Apple Pro Res 422
format (1920 x 1080 pixels) and are 385 Mb-1.3 GB in size. The low-res clips are in Apple Quicktime
H.264 format (853 x 480 pixels) and are 10-26 MB in size).

"Low-Res" files - Apple Quicktime H.264 format (853 x 480 pixels)
     
File Name / Description
File size
 

Keynote icon

  Boca_snowblower_vent_low.mov 9.3MB
  Shimmering hot water exits from a new "snowblower" vent named "Boca" in the new lava flow. The vent looks like a hole lined with white, created by microbes thriving in the hot spring water. Snowblower vents are only seen right after eruptions and are named for the white particles that spew out of the seafloor. They are evidence of a vast microbial bloom that was created by the eruption.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 

Keynote icon

  New_lava_below_arch_low.mov 11.6MB
  Here, the new lava that erupted in April 2011 flowed under an archway formed in an older lava flow at Axial Seamount.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 

Keynote icon

  New_lava_sample_low.mov 22.0MB
  The manipulator arm on the Jason remotely operated vehicle takes a sample of the new lava flow (upper left) that was erupted in April 2011.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 

Keynote icon

  OBH_chain_low.mov 12.0MB
  Chain attached to an ocean-bottom hydrophone is found coming out of the seafloor where a new lava flow buried the instrument at Axial Seamount in 2011. The chain is held up by flotation that is still attached at the top of the mooring (above and out of view). The front of the Jason remotely operated vehicle is visible at right.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 
     
  The following video clips include the MBARI logo. To get a version without this logo, please contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 831-755-1835, kfb@mbari.org
 

Keynote icon

  axial-contact-mbari-low.mov 24.8MB
  An ROV views the contact between the new 2011 lava flow and the underlying older lava flow that was erupted in 1998. The new lava is dark black and glassy, while the older lava is lighter colored and sedimented. Audio is included from the ROV control room.
Video credit: Copyright 2011 MBARI
 

Keynote icon

  axial-snowblower-mbari-low.mov 18.9MB
  The ROV circles around a "snowblower" hydrothermal vent in the 2011 lava flow, which is still cooling just months after the eruption at Axial Seamount. The white particles in the water are from a bacterial bloom in the subsurface fueled by the eruption.
Video credit: Copyright 2011 MBARI
 

 

  To download file, Right-Click with your mouse on the file name or icon (Control-Click on a Mac) and download to your hard drive.  

HD Video - Apple ProRes 422 (LT) 1920x1080 Millions of colors
     
File Name / Description
File size
 

Keynote icon

  Boca_snowblower_vent_HD.mov 722.1MB
  Shimmering hot water exits from a new "snowblower" vent named "Boca" in the new lava flow. The vent looks like a hole lined with white, created by microbes thriving in the hot spring water. Snowblower vents are only seen right after eruptions and are named for the white particles that spew out of the seafloor. They are evidence of a vast microbial bloom that was created by the eruption.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 

Keynote icon

  New_lava_below_arch_HD.mov 382.3MB
  Here, the new lava that erupted in April 2011 flowed under an archway formed in an older lava flow at Axial Seamount.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 

Keynote icon

  New_lava_sample_HD.mov 713.7MB
  The manipulator arm on the Jason remotely operated vehicle takes a sample of the new lava flow (upper left) that was erupted in April 2011.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 

Keynote icon

  OBH_chain_HD.mov 367.9MB
  Chain attached to an ocean-bottom hydrophone is found coming out of the seafloor where a new lava flow buried the instrument at Axial Seamount in 2011. The chain is held up by flotation that is still attached at the top of the mooring (above and out of view). The front of the Jason remotely operated vehicle is visible at right.
Video credit: Bill Chadwick, Oregon State University, Copyright Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
 
     
  The following video clips include the MBARI logo. To get a version without this logo, please contact: Kim Fulton-Bennett, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), 831-755-1835, kfb@mbari.org
 

Keynote icon

  axial-contact-mbari-HD.mov 1.27GB
  An ROV views the contact between the new 2011 lava flow and the underlying older lava flow that was erupted in 1998. The new lava is dark black and glassy, while the older lava is lighter colored and sedimented. Audio is included from the ROV control room.
Video credit: Copyright 2011 MBARI
 

Keynote icon

  axial-snowblower-mbari-HD.mov 1.03GB
  The ROV circles around a "snowblower" hydrothermal vent in the 2011 lava flow, which is still cooling just months after the eruption at Axial Seamount. The white particles in the water are from a bacterial bloom in the subsurface fueled by the eruption.
Video credit: Copyright 2011 MBARI
 

 

  To download file, Right-Click with your mouse on the file name or icon (Control-Click on a Mac) and download to your hard drive.  

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